SHOW INFORMATION

License a Show

To be considered for medal and awards programs, shows must be sanctioned.  

Please use the button to request a show sanction form.

For other forms related to shows, please go to:

https://www.confederationwe.us/forms/


Performance Levels

Show management may offer classes in any of the following levels/divisions:

  1. Children. This level is limited to riders 8 to 13 years of age. There is a separate Dressage trial and EOH trial for this level. Walk and trot only. Rising or sitting trot is allowed. There is no Speed trial at this level.

  2. Level 1 – Intro. This is an introductory level designed for new horse-rider pairs, as well as young or green horses. There is no Speed trial at this level. Walk and trot are required in the Dressage and EOH trials (i.e., canter is not allowed). Rising or sitting trot is allowed. Trot is required between obstacles in EOH. Two hands may be used on the reins. May be offered for Youth, Amateur and Open Divisions, as well as Young Horse Division.

  3. Level 2 – Novice A. This level is designed for horse-rider pairs who are beginning their development in WE. Canter is required in the Dressage trial and between obstacles in EOH. Changes of lead are through the trot. Obstacles must be trotted, unless required or allowed to be walked. Rising or sitting trot is allowed. Two hands may be used on the reins. May be offered for Youth, Amateur and Open Divisions, as well as Young Horse Division.

  4. Level 3 – Novice B. Sitting trot is required in the Dressage trial. Canter is required on and between obstacles. Changes of lead through the trot are required. Two hands may be used on the reins. May be offered for Youth, Amateur and Open Divisions, as well as Young Horse Division.

  5. Level 4 – Intermediate A. This level is designed for horse-rider pairs progressing in their development. Sitting trot is required in the Dressage trial. Simple changes of lead through the walk are required. Two hands may be used on the reins. May be offered for Youth, Amateur and Open Divisions.

  6. Level 5 – Intermediate B. Sitting trot is required in the Dressage trial. Flying changes are required. Two hands may be used on the reins. May be offered for Youth, Amateur and Open Divisions.

  7. Level 6 – Advanced. Sitting trot is required in the Dressage trial. Flying changes are required. One hand must be used on the reins. May be offered for Youth, Amateur and Open Divisions.

  8. Level 7 – Masters (International Level). Sitting trot is required in the Dressage trial. Changes at canter must be flying changes. One hand must be used on the reins. Offered for the Open Division only.

Level Trot Canter/Lead Change Hands Speed Trial
Children Sitting or rising No 1 or 2 No
L1 - Intro Sitting or rising No 1 or 2 No
L2 - Novice A Sitting or rising Yes/thru trot 1 or 2 Yes
L3 - Novice B Sitting Yes/thru trot 1 or 2 Yes
L4 - Inter A Sitting Yes/thru walk 1 or 2 Yes
L5 - Inter B Sitting Yes/flying 1 or 2 Yes
L6 - Advanced Sitting Yes/flying 1 Yes
L7 - Masters Sitting Yes/flying 1 Yes
 

Types of Shows

Note:  The competition year runs from December 1 through November

Schooling Shows

Schooling Shows Schooling shows are intended to be low-pressure opportunities for riders and horses to gain experience, practice test and course riding, and get the feel of competition. They provide a valuable opportunity for competitors and judges to gain experience. Schooling shows are not governed or licensed by any U.S. national WE organization. Participation in them does not impact the advancement requirements defined in Section 1.8, and no points toward advancement are earned at schooling shows.

B-Rated Shows

B-Rated Shows B-rated shows are the standard competition offered throughout the U.S. Scores earned in B rated competitions result in points earned toward required advancement and to determine eligibility for national championship competitions. B-rated competitions may take place over one or more days. B-rated shows may award prize money.

 A-Rated Shows

Rated Shows An A-rated competition is intended to be a premier competition. Scores earned at A-rated competitions result in points earned toward required advancement and to determine eligibility for national championship competitions. A-rated competitions may take place over two or more days. A-rated shows may award prize money.

Regional Championships

Regional Championships Regional championships may be held in any of the defined regions. Regional championships can be held no more frequently than once per year per region, but are not required to be held every year. Organizing associations designate the qualifying period. To be eligible to compete in a regional championship, a horse and rider combination must have competed in at least one B-rated competition within the region within the qualifying period. At the qualifying competition, the combination must have competed in the level for which they are qualifying, have successfully completed all trials, and scored an average minimum of 58% in the Dressage and EOH trials. Show management may require additional qualification by either scores or accrued points. Scores earned at regional championships result in points earned toward required advancement. Scores earned at regional championships are used to determine eligibility for national championship competitions. Regional championships may take place over two or more days. Prize money may be awarded.

Any horse and rider combination that has won a regional championship three times at a given level is not eligible to compete in subsequent regional championships at that level or below. Masters level riders are excluded from this restriction.

Regions are defined as follows:

  1. NW Northwest - Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana

  2. SW Southwest - California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Hawaii, U.S. territories in the Pacific

  3. NGP Northern Great Plains - Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado

  4. SGP Southern Great Plains - New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana

  5. GL Great Lakes - Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky

  6. NE Northeast - New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, District of Columbia

  7. SE Southeast - Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, U.S. territories in the Atlantic

 National Championships

National championships can be held no more frequently than once per year, but are not required to be held every year. Organizing associations designate the qualifying period. To be eligible to compete in a national championship, a horse and rider combination must have competed in at least one A–rated or one B-rated competition within the qualifying period for which the championship applies. At the qualifying competition, the combination must have competed in the level for which they are qualifying and have successfully completed all trials and scored an average minimum of 58% in the Dressage and Ease of Handling trials. Rider eligibility will be based upon the qualifying period designated by the national body for which the national championship applies, regardless of whether the championship competition is held after the end of the competition year. This also applies to age limitation of riders and horses. Only riders who have lived in the United States for a minimum of 6 consecutive months may compete in national championships. Scores earned at national championship competitions result in points earned toward required advancement. National championships may take place over two or more days. Prize money may be awarded. Any horse and rider combination that has won a national championship three times at a given level is not eligible to compete in subsequent national championships at that level or below. Masters level riders are excluded from this restriction.

Carmen Franco

Carmen Franco